25 Poorest Countries in the World 2020

What Is Poverty?

In simple terms, poverty could be defined as a lack of financial resources (money and other capital). This defect, in turn, means that you cannot afford to buy food, clothing and anything else that people with good finances see as obvious. Accommodation also costs money. Poverty also causes many other shortcomings in the lives of vulnerable people. Keep reading the 25 Poorest Countries in the world post to get know more about.

Poverty creates exclusion and powerlessness. This exclusion can be demonstrated in many ways where the possibility of higher education is an example. Although the educational opportunities exist for many poor people, the poor may be forced to refuse for various reasons. The right to education may exist, but the possibility of completing the education is lacking. Instead, you might have to take a low-paid job to support your family. Therefore, higher education (and in many cases education at all) is a way of life that quite a few poor people have the opportunity to choose. Poverty also creates freedom and a lack of rights.

As far as i do believe the main reason behind poverty is lack of resources to those countries people. I would also like to hear from you behind the poverty in these poorest countries in the world. Hunger in the world is increasing gradually. And it is a great threat that it will also keep rising the no. of deaths due to hunger. In adding to this, I think we are also running out of the natural resources on earth. There could be many factors behind this extreme poverty in various part on this planet.

What are the poorest countries in the world?

Unsurprisingly, the vast majority of the twenty-five poorest countries in the world in 2020 are located on the African continent. These savings total gross domestic product (GDP) of $ 314.67 billion, 15 billion more than in 2018 (+ 4.8%). This was barely more than the gross domestic product recorded by Bangladesh that year (314.65). The 25 poorest countries in the world have an average GDP per ca-pita of $ 666. For comparison, France’s per ca-pita GDP exceeds $ 42,000 in 2019.

Here is the list of 25 Poorest Countries in the World and GDP Per Capita 2020 list

RankCountryGDP per capita in current US dollars in 2020
1South Sudan236
2Burundi310
3Malawi367
4Central african republic441
5Madagascar471
6Niger488
7mozambique493
8Democratic Republic of Congo495
9Sierra Leone517
10afghanistan548
11Togo682
12Liberia704
13Sudan728
14Burkina Faso744
15Uganda759
16Gambia778
17Tajikistan828
18Rwanda830
19Comoros833
20Haiti854
21Guinea-Bissau866
22Chad888
23Yemen919
24Guinea926
25Mali934

South Sudan once again tops the ranking, with a GDP per capita of $ 236 in 2018. It is the only country in the list of the 25 poorest nations in the world to have a GDP per capita below the threshold of 300 dollars. It is also one of the five to post a GDP per capita in decline compared to 2018. And, among them, it is the one which records the largest decrease (-22.2%). Burundi climbs on the second step of this sad podium, with a GDP per capita of 307 dollars (+ 0.9% over one year). Malawi completes this top three, with a GDP of $ 367 per capita, up 4.4% from 2018. On the opposite side, Yemen ($ 919 per capita), Guinea (926 dollars per capita) and Mali (934 dollars per capita) close the march.

What is the poorest country in Africa?

South Sudan is the the most poorest country in the world if we take the gross domestic product per capita as an indicator, South Sudan is also the poorest country on the African continent.

25 Poorest Countries in the World by 2020 Ranking List

1st: South Sudan, 236 dollars of GDP per capita

South Sudan remains in first place in the ranking of the poorest countries on the planet, with a GDP per capita of 236 dollars (-22.2% compared to 2018). The East African country has a gross domestic product of $ 3.15 billion for a population of 13.38 million.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 223 dollars
  • 2020 GDP: $ 3.15 billion
  • Population 2020: 13.38 million inhabitants

2nd: Burundi, 310 dollars of GDP per capita

Burundi, the second poorest country in the world. 

Burundi, the poorest country in the world in 2015, is now on the second step of this sad podium, with a gross domestic product per capita of 310 dollars. The East African country now has a GDP of $ 3.57 billion for a population of more than 11 million.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 310 dollars
  • 2020 GDP: $ 3.57 billion
  • Population 2020: 11.53 million inhabitants

3rd: Malawi, 367 dollars of GDP per capita

Malawi comes out on top of the poorest countries in the world, with 367 dollars of GDP per capita in 2020. The African country displays this year a GDP of 7.44 billion dollars for a population of 20.29 million inhabitants . According to the World Bank, 51.5% of the Malawi population lived below the poverty line in 2016.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 367 dollars
  • 2020 GDP: $ 7.44 billion
  • Population 2020: 20.29 million inhabitants

4th: Central African Republic, 441 dollars of GDP per capita

The Central African Republic ranks fourth this year in the ranking of countries producing the least wealth per capita in the world. The Central African country records in 2020 a GDP of 2.29 billion dollars for a population of more than 5 million inhabitants, or 441 dollars per capita. In 2008, 62% of the Central African population lived below the poverty line according to the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 441
  • 2020 GDP: $ 2.29 billion
  • Population 2020: 5.18 million inhabitants

5th: Madagascar, 471 dollars of GDP per capita

In 2019, Madagascar ranks fifth in the ranking of countries that produce the least wealth per capita, with a GDP per capita of $ 471. The country displays this year a gross domestic product of 12.73 billion dollars for a population of 27.06 million inhabitants. According to the World Bank, 70.7% of Malagasy people lived below the poverty line in 2012.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 471
  • 2020 GDP: $ 12.73 billion
  • Population 2020: 27.05 million inhabitants

6th: Niger, 488 dollars of GDP per capita

Niger ranks sixth in the list of countries producing the least wealth in 2020, with a gross domestic product per capita of 488 dollars, up more than 2.2% compared to 2018. The country of North Africa this year has a GDP of 9.72 billion dollars for 19.94 million inhabitants. In 2014, 44.5% of Nigerien’s lived below the poverty line, according to the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 488 dollars
  • 2020 GDP: $ 9.72 billion
  • Population 2020: 19.94 million inhabitants

7th: Mozambique, 493 dollars of GDP per capita

With a GDP of $ 493 per capita in 2020, Mozambique ranks 7th among the nations that produce the least wealth per capita. The East African country this year has a GDP of 15.37 billion dollars for 31.16 million inhabitants. According to the World Bank, 46.1% of Mozambicans lived below the poverty line in 2014.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 493
  • 2020 GDP: $ 15.37 billion
  • Population 2020: 31.16 million inhabitants

8th: Democratic Republic of Congo, 495 dollars of GDP per capita

In 2019, the gross domestic product per Congolese is 495 dollars. A figure up 10.3% compared to 2018 and which earned it 8th place in the ranking of the poorest countries on the planet. It now has a GDP of $ 48.46 billion for 97.88 million inhabitants. According to the World Bank, the proportion of the Congolese population living below the poverty line reached 46.5% in 2011.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 495 dollars
  • 2020 GDP: $ 48.46 billion
  • Population 2020: 97.88 million inhabitants

9th: Sierra Leone, 517 dollars of GDP per capita

Sierra Leone ranks 9th in the 2020 poorest countries per capita ranking, with a gross domestic product per capita of $ 517. This West African country has a GDP of $ 4 billion for 7.74 million inhabitants. 52.9% of its inhabitants lived below the poverty line in 2011, figures the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 517
  • 2020 GDP: $ 4 billion
  • Population 2020: 7.74 million inhabitants

10th: Afghanistan, 548 dollars of GDP per capita

Outside the African continent, Afghanistan is the country that produces the least wealth per capita in 2020, with a GDP per capita of 548 dollars. A figure slightly increasing (0.7%) compared to 2018. The gross domestic product of Afghanistan amounts to 19.99 billion dollars for a total population of 36.51 million inhabitants.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 548 dollars
  • 2020 GDP : $ 19.99 billion
  • Population 2020: 36.51 million inhabitants

11th: Togo, 682 dollars of GDP per capita

The gross domestic product by Togolese amounts to 682 dollars in 2019. This figure is in the country located west of Africa 11th in the ranking of the world’s poorest countries. Togo has a GDP of 5.59 billion dollars for 8.2 million inhabitants. In 2015, 55.1% of its inhabitants lived below the poverty line, according to the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 682
  • 2020 GDP: $ 5.59 billion
  • Population 2020: 8.20 million inhabitants

12th: Liberia, 704 dollars of GDP per capita

Liberia ranks 12th among the poorest countries in the world. The GDP by Liberian tops out at 704 dollars in 2020. Note that the countries of West Africa shows this year a GDP of $ 3.22 billion for a population of 4.58 million. In 2016, according to the World Bank, 50.9% of the local population lived below the poverty line.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 704
  • 2020 GDP: $ 3.22 billion
  • Population 2020: 4.58 million inhabitants

13th: Sudan, 728 dollars of GDP per capita

In 2019, Sudan ranks 13th in the ranking of the poorest countries in the world. The GDP per Sudanese is 728 dollars in 2020, or a gross domestic product of 31.47 billion dollars for 43.22 million inhabitants. The World Bank estimates that the proportion of the national population living below the poverty line in 2009 was 46.5%.

  • GDP per capita in 2020  : $ 728
  • 2020 GDP: $ 31.47 billion
  • Population 2020: 43.22 million inhabitants

14th: Burkina Faso, 744 dollars of GDP per capita

With a GDP per capita of $ 744 in 2020, Burkina Faso is among the countries that produce the least wealth per capita. Burkina Faso’s GDP this year amounts to almost 14.88 billion dollars for 20 million inhabitants. In 2014, 40.1% of the local population lived below the national poverty line, figures the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 744
  • 2020 GDP: $ 14.88 billion
  • Population 2020: 20 million inhabitants

15th: Uganda, $ 759 of GDP per capita

In 2020, Uganda ranks 15th in the world ranking of nations producing the least wealth per capita, with a GDP per capita of $ 759 (+ 4.8%). This West African country this year has a gross domestic product of $ 30.37 billion for 40 million people. According to the World Bank, 21.4% of the local population lived below the poverty line in 2016.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 759
  • 2020 GDP: $ 30.37 billion
  • Population 2020: 40 million inhabitants

16th: Gambia, 778 dollars of GDP per capita

In 2020, Gambia’s gross domestic product is $ 1.74 billion. Relative to the number of Gambians, or 2.24 million inhabitants, this represents 778 dollars. A figure up 4.4% year on year and which puts the West African country in 16th place in the ranking of the poorest countries in the world. 48.6% of Gambians lived below the poverty line in 2015, according to the latest figures from the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 778
  • 2020 GDP: $ 1.74 billion
  • Population 2020: 2.24 million inhabitants

17th: Tajikistan, 828 dollars of GDP per capita

In 2020, Tajikistan has a per capita GDP of $ 828, or gross domestic product of $ 7.70 billion for 9.29 million inhabitants. The rate of the population living below the poverty line, it decreases and falls to 31.3% in 2015, according to the latest data recorded by the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 828 dollars
  • 2020 GDP: $ 7.70 billion
  • Population 2020: 9.29 million inhabitants

18th: Rwanda, 830 dollars of GDP per capita

In one year, the GDP per Rwandan grew by 4.9% to reach 830 dollars in 2020. A figure which puts the country in 18th place in the ranking of the poorest nations on the planet. Rwanda has a gross domestic product of 10.21 billion dollars for 12.30 million Rwandans. According to the World Bank, 38.2% of them were still living below the poverty line in 2016.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 830 dollars
  • 2020 GDP: $ 10.21 billion
  • Population 2020: 12.30 million inhabitants

19th: Comoros, 833 dollars of GDP per capita

The Comoros, a small archipelago of 872,000 inhabitants located east of Mozambique and north-west of Madagascar, ranked 19th in the ranking of the poorest nations in the world in 2020. Gross domestic product per Comorian stands at $ 833 . The Comoros this year has a GDP of 726 million dollars for nearly 872,000 inhabitants. 42.4% of its population lives below the poverty line in 2013, figures the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 833 dollars
  • 2020 GDP: $ 0.73 billion
  • Population 2020: 872,000 inhabitants

20th: Haiti, 854 dollars of GDP per capita

With a GDP per capita of 854 dollars in 2020, Haiti assumes the 20 th  place in the ranking of the world’s poorest nations. The gross domestic product of Haiti now amounts to 9.60 billion for a population of 11.25 million. According to the World Bank, 58.5% of the local population lived below the poverty line in 2012.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 854
  • 2020 GDP: $ 9.60 billion
  • Population 2020: 11.25 million inhabitants

21st: Guinea-Bissau, $ 866 of GDP per capita

Guinea-Bissau, located between The Gambia and Guinea, comes in 21st position in the ranking of countries that produce the least wealth per capita in 2020, with a GDP per capita of $ 866. (+ 3.1%) The country has a gross domestic product of 1.54 billion dollars for 1.78 million inhabitants. In 2010, 69.3% of Bissau-Guineans lived below the poverty line, according to the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 866
  • 2020 GDP: $ 1.54 billion
  • Population 2020: 1.78 million inhabitants

22nd: Chad, 888 dollars of GDP per capita

In one year, the GDP per Chadian grew by 1.6% to reach $ 888 in 2020. A figure which brings the country 22nd place in the sad ranking of the least wealthy nations on the planet. Chad has gross domestic product of more than 11.37 billion dollars for 12.80 million Chadians. According to the World Bank, 46.7% of them were still living below the poverty line in 2011.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 888
  • 2020 GDP: $ 11.37 billion
  • Population 2020: 12.80 million inhabitants

23rd: Yemen, 919 dollars of GDP per capita

In 2020, Yemen presents a GDP per capita which amounts to 919 dollars, that is to say a gross domestic product of 29.08 billion dollars for 31.65 million inhabitants. The rate of the population living below the poverty line reached 48.6% in 2014, according to the latest data recorded by the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 919
  • 2020 GDP: $ 29.08 billion
  • Population 2020: 31.65 million inhabitants

24th: Guinea, 926 dollars of GDP per capita

Guinea ranks 24th in the 2020 ranking of countries that produce the least wealth per capita with a gross domestic product per capita of $926. This West African country has a GDP of 12.62 billion dollars for more than 13.63 million inhabitants. In 2012, 55.2% of the Guinean population lived below the poverty line, measures the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: 926 dollars
  • 2020 GDP: $ 12.62 billion
  • Population 2020: 13.63 million inhabitants

25th: Mali, $ 934 of GDP per capita

In 2020, Mali has a per capita GDP of $934, or a gross domestic product of $17.83 billion for 20 million inhabitants. The rate of the population living below the poverty line reached 41.1% in 2009, according to the latest data recorded by the World Bank.

  • GDP per capita in 2020: $ 934
  • 2020 GDP: $ 17.83 billion
  • Population 2020: 20 million inhabitants

I believe you would be sad to know about all these 25 poorest countries in the world. Moreover, most of these countries population is living below the poverty line.

List of 10 Poorest Countries in Europe

On the old continent, there are economies that are losing momentum or have stalled. Here are the 10 poorest countries in Europe. No suspense, all these countries are in Eastern Europe.

  • 1. Moldova
  • 2. Ukraine
  • 3. Kosovo
  • 4. Albania
  • 5. Bosnia
  • 6. Macedonia
  • 7. Belarus
  • 8. Serbia
  • 9. Montenegro
  • 10. Bulgaria

Read the Complete Details about the 10 poorest countries in Europe in below given link.

Common Question and Answers about the poverty and poorest Countries

What is the international poverty line and, based on this indicator, how many people live in extreme poverty in the world?

The international poverty line is set at $ 1.90 per person per day, based on 2011 conversion rates into purchasing power parity (PPP). In 2015, and according to the latest available data, the share of the world population living in poverty decreased to 10%, which represents approximately 736 million people. In a quarter of a century, more than 1.1 billion people (in net terms) have seen their standard of living improve enough to escape extreme poverty.

What about poverty in different regions of the world?

The decline in poverty has been very uneven across regions. In 2015, more than half of the world’s poor lived in sub-Saharan Africa, and it is in this region and in South Asia that 85% of the poor are concentrated. The remaining 15%, or about 106 million people, lived in the other four regions of the world. In all regions except sub-Saharan Africa, average poverty rates range from 1.5 to 12.4%; about 41% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa lives below the international poverty line.

Poverty rates have increased in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, but the situation in this region is much less critical than that of sub-Saharan Africa. The proportion of the population of the MENA region living in extreme poverty increased from 2.7% in 2013 to 5% in 2015, which means that the number of poor fell in two years from 9.5 million to 18 , 7 million. Fragility and conflicts in the region, particularly in Syria and Yemen, are undermining livelihoods and are behind the recent surge in poverty.

Which Countries have the Greatest or Highest number of Poor People?

The most populous countries in South Asia (India and Bangladesh) and sub-Saharan Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo) have the highest number of people living in extreme poverty. With more than 170 million poor people in 2015, India has the greatest number of poor people and this figure represents almost a quarter of global poverty. In the South Asia region, for example, four out of five extremely poor people live in India. With a poverty rate of 13.4% and a population of no less than 1.3 billion, India has a large number of poor people in absolute terms.

However, India’s place as the country with the highest number of poor people in the world is expected to change in the near future. Indeed, projections indicate that Nigeria may have already overtaken India. This uncertainty about the respective situations of Nigeria and India is partly due to the fact that these countries are very close to this tipping point. It is also the consequence of various problems linked to the measurement of world poverty. For more details on the situation in each country, see povertydata.worldbank.org

Why did the last estimate of global poverty date from 2015 and not from 2018?  

Estimates of global poverty are based on household surveys in 164 countries. These surveys are carried out independently, usually by statistical agencies or planning ministries in each country. They are long and complex to carry out and, in most countries, they are only carried out every three or five years. In addition, collecting, processing and analyzing data is time consuming. It is because of these time lags that 2015 is the most recent year for which there is sufficient data to estimate poverty on a global scale.

Given these gaps and the fact that the situation of extreme poverty generally does not change much from year to year, the World Bank Group provides estimates of global poverty every two years. The next estimates will be published in the fall of 2020, and will cover the year 2017.

What are the trends for 2018?

Taking into account the discrepancies mentioned above, we can make certain hypotheses on the relationship between economic and demographic growth to estimate the rate of extreme poverty in 2018. We assume that only a fraction of the growth in GDP per capita affects the improvement of the living conditions of a household. We also assume that the inequalities of a country remained unchanged between 2015 and 2018. Based on these assumptions, we estimate that the rate of extreme poverty in the world should be around 8.6% in 2018 , down 1.4 percentage points from 2015. This means that the World Bank’s interim target of reducing extreme poverty to less than 9% in 2020 has probably already been reached.

In 2015, the World Bank had projected an extreme poverty rate of 9.6% for 2015. Why give a different figure today?

The figure advanced in 2015 was a forecast based on assumptions. Today, we have a lot more data and we estimate that the rate is more like 10%.

In 2016, the World Bank estimated that the extreme poverty rate for 2013 was 10.7%. Today, you indicate that it was 11.2%. What caused this change?

The discrepancy between the figures for 2013, which appeared in the 2016 report, and the current figures is due to regular updates that incorporate the most recent household surveys. When a new survey is available for a country, the estimates are updated to reflect this additional information.

Are we on track to end extreme poverty by 2030?

In recent years, the pace of poverty reduction has slowed. Between 2013 and 2015, poverty fell by 0.6 percentage points per year, while the average decline for the past 25 years has been one point per year. In addition, the forecast for 2018 (8.6%) indicates that the rate of poverty reduction is even slower, at less than half a point per year between 2015 and 2018. It is more difficult to project the horizon 2030, but we can nevertheless study various scenarios to determine how the situation could evolve. To do this, we analyze scenarios based on different growth levels to project a poverty reduction rate. According to this analysis, if the goal of ending extreme poverty in the world by 2030 is to be reached, The income of the poorest 40% will have to increase by 8% or more each year. Based on current growth rates, the scenarios suggest an extreme poverty rate of more than 5% in 2030.

Since poverty has decreased by 25 percentage points over the past 25 years, why is poverty reduction by 7 points between 2015 and 2030 only considered in one of the scenarios?

Progress has been uneven across regions and countries. The two regions with the highest number of poor in 1990 were East Asia-Pacific and South Asia, with a total of 80% of extreme poverty. But with the rapid expansion of China, the concentration of poverty shifted from East Asia in the 1990s to South Asia in 2002, then to sub-Saharan Africa in 2010. In South Asia, the poverty rate and the number of poor people have fallen steadily, but given the large population, the region’s contribution to global poverty remains high. This is a different situation from that in sub-Saharan Africa, where the total number of poor has increased, and this increase largely explains the shift in the concentration of poverty from South Asia to sub-Saharan Africa. For 2030, forecasts indicate that nine out of ten people living in extreme poverty will live in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, the slowdown in poverty reduction between 2013 and 2015 partly reflects the gloomy economic growth and low commodity prices that weighed on the economies of many developing countries during this period.

Finally, out of the 164 countries for which the World Bank measures changes in poverty, more than half (84 countries) already recorded rates below 3% in 2015. This encouraging result is, however, one of the reasons for the slowdown observed today in the decline in the poverty rate. Indeed, there are fewer countries than before that have large numbers of poor people. And as extreme poverty is increasingly concentrated, significant progress in reducing global poverty can only be achieved if progress is made in the countries where poverty is greatest.

If the objective is a world without poverty, why measure progress towards a rate of 3% and not aim for a zero rate?

The 3% target stems from both empirical and conceptual considerations. In some countries, poverty remains deeply ingrained and widespread and, when it came to setting the initial target, the rate of 3% was considered ambitious, but achievable. Conceptually, too, it’s important to aim for a target greater than zero. The purpose of a target is to promote the achievement of a goal and for the target to play this role, it must be able to be measured in a credible way. However, as countries move towards the elimination of extreme poverty, it becomes increasingly difficult to measure increasingly weaker rates with precision from relatively small samples of a large population. These surveys cannot, so to speak, credibly measure a poverty rate of zero.

How is the international poverty line set?

We are first interested in the national poverty lines, which generally reflect the amount of money necessary for the inhabitants of a country to meet their basic needs in terms of food, clothing and housing.  

But to know the number of people in the world who live in extreme poverty, one cannot just add up the poverty rates of each country: this would amount to using a different measurement instrument to identify who is poor in each country. . So we need a threshold that measures poverty in all countries with the same standard.

In 1990, the World Bank proposed to measure global poverty in terms of the poorest countries. The national poverty lines of a number of the world’s poorest countries were then converted into a common currency using exchange rates in purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP exchange rates allow an equivalent value to be given to the same quantity of goods and services from one country to another. As a result of this conversion, it appeared that the value of the national poverty line in the six poorest countries was around $ 1 per day per person, and that is how the first threshold was defined. poverty line.

Then, in 2005, the collection of a new series of data made it possible to obtain a larger volume of prices comparable between countries. The international poverty line was then updated based on the national poverty lines of the 15 poorest countries in the world. More specifically, the average of these 15 thresholds resulted in a revised threshold of $ 1.25 per person per day (again, in PPP).

Similarly, in 2015, we started from the poverty lines of these 15 poorest countries, at 2005 prices (keeping the same standard), to lead to the definition of a new international poverty line of 1 $ 90 per day in 2011 PPP.  

What is purchasing power parity and how is it achieved?

Purchasing power parity (PPP) allows us to translate the income and consumption of each country into globally comparable terms. This conversion rate is calculated by collecting data on prices in all countries of the world. The International Comparison Program (ICP) is responsible for collecting this data and determining the PPPs for a given year. PCI is an independent statistical program, which has a World Bureau hosted by the World Bank.

These poorest countries in the world are looking forward more from the rest of world to lift them up from poverty line. Hopefully you like this all info about world’s poorest nations. Please Share the words with other people. Thank you!

Source: International Monetary Fund, World Economic Forum.

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